Share Your World – Week 9

share-your-world2

This Share Your World hosted by Cee Photography post is actually for last week but I forgot to schedule it to post yesterday. So one day behind but here we go!

Here are this week’s questions:

What are you reading right now?

Redeployment by Phil Klay, both the ebook and the audiobook. It’s one of the many books and audiobooks I have about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and they’re all just… so far from my usual fare of fiction reading and it’s unsettling only because I actually prefer reading these things over the stuff I write, romance. Ask me what fiction novel I last read and I can’t tell you what the heck it was. Anyway, here’s a bit about what it’s about:

Phil Klay’s Redeployment takes readers to the frontlines of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, asking us to understand what happened there, and what happened to the soldiers who returned.  Interwoven with themes of brutality and faith, guilt and fear, helplessness and survival, the characters in these stories struggle to make meaning out of chaos.

In “Redeployment”, a soldier who has had to shoot dogs because they were eating human corpses must learn what it is like to return to domestic life in suburbia, surrounded by people “who have no idea where Fallujah is, where three members of your platoon died.”  In “After Action Report”, a Lance Corporal seeks expiation for a killing he didn’t commit, in order that his best friend will be unburdened.  A Mortuary Affairs Marine tells about his experiences collecting remains—of U.S. and Iraqi soldiers both.  A chaplain sees his understanding of Christianity, and his ability to provide solace through religion, tested by the actions of a ferocious Colonel.  And in the darkly comic “Money as a Weapons System”, a young Foreign Service Officer is given the absurd task of helping Iraqis improve their lives by teaching them to play baseball.  These stories reveal the intricate combination of monotony, bureaucracy, comradeship and violence that make up a soldier’s daily life at war, and the isolation, remorse, and despair that can accompany a soldier’s homecoming. (From Amazon)

What was your first adult job?

If it had to do with family recommendations, it would be stringing beads for my grand-aunt who exported handmade necklaces made from coral (hindsight: it was BAD for the environment because they were harvesting actual coral that belonged in the ocean, not hanging around someone’s neck, all polished and nice).

If it’s a job that I earned, like a real honest-to-god job, then it was as a radio newscaster for the station Y101, the local version. They picked me because I could speak with an “American” accent, thanks to my American stepdad.

 What’s your favorite breakfast cereal?

My mom got me hooked on Frosted Flakes whenever I came by to visit but I guess my all-time favorite was Lucky Charms and now it’s my son’s favorite. I have to stick to Honey Bunches of Oats with almonds now and granola.

What did you appreciate or what made you smile this past week?  Feel free to use a quote, a photo, a story, or even a combination.

I appreciate every soldier’s service and sacrifice that we never hear about. The general public (myself included), really has NO idea what they go through over there and what they have to go through coming back.

3 thoughts on “Share Your World – Week 9

    1. I really like only the marshmallow charms but don’t tell anyone LOL

      Yes, the book is powerful. I really should be writing instead of reading but that’s for another post LOL

      Liked by 1 person

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